The LeSabre

Matt’s Movie Corner: Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)

Matt%E2%80%99s+Movie+Corner%3A+Birdman+or+%28The+Unexpected+Virtue+of+Ignorance%29

Levi Christy

Actors are crazy. Never be an actor because you will most likely go completely insane.

Birdman, in theatres now, is the story of a washed up actor (Michael Keaton) who tries to regain his former glory by directing and starring in his own Broadway show. This movie has been hyped by critics for its dark humor and amazing acting; I disagree. This movie just reminded me how ridiculous films can be.

Although the cast is phenomenal, there are barely any other positives to this movie. First off, the movie takes place inside of a dark theatre for its entirety. There are absolutely no set changes and this makes for some really dull backgrounds. The characters are also narcissistic, crazy, and just plain unrealistic; the director makes you hate the characters, and he gives them absolutely no redemption. Why would someone like Emma Stone get an Oscar nod for a movie that she appears in for a total of 10 minutes? The movie just ends with no real cap to the story. This leads me believe that there is no virtue in ignorance.

The movie needs some real help to save it from its downfalls. If this movie wins any Oscars, I’ll be disappointed. C

Hi, you’re appreciated

You’re appreciated. Two simple words that can totally turn someone’s day around.

Kids nowadays, even in Sartell, are not being told this enough, which is sad because a lack of love leads to self-hatred and awful habits. One of the most common causes of self-injury is low self-esteem, and over 40% of young people personally know someone who has done it.

Many students, although academically and physically gifted, are pushed to extreme levels of negative self-image. Keep in mind that these kids are most likely getting A’s in their classes and going to college on full ride sports scholarships.  Many think that this particular population of students shouldn’t feel bad about themselves because they are doing well.  Research from YoungMinds.org, a website charity dedicated to improving the well-being and mental health status of teenagers everywhere, states that 1 out of 10 high school students are likely to fall into depression and anxiety at any given time. In Sartell, that’s about 25 per grade. You do the math.

Other students, those not extremely gifted, are also falling into the depression and anxiety cycle because they feel they do not measure up to the previously mentioned academically awesome or popular kids. 75 percent of high school students are afraid of getting bad grades or performing poorly on academics. No wonder they fall into this cycle.  They are not told that they are good enough, often enough. Even if their grades aren’t as high as the previously mentioned students, they’re still wonderful people. These people are just as awesome and will do just as well as the aforementioned population, they just don’t feel like they are thanks to society. Not being reinforced for being awesome increases the number of teens with self-hatred tendencies.

According to DoSomething.Org, another website charity dedicated to mental health, low self-esteem is a thinking disorder in which an individual views him/herself as inadequate, unlovable, and/or incompetent. Once formed, this negative view permeates every thought, producing faulty assumptions and ongoing self-defeating behavior. See? It’s not just something that is easily overcome; it’s something that consumes one’s mind. Also taken from DoSomething.org, 7 in 10 girls believe that they are not good enough or don’t measure up in some way, including their looks, performance in school and relationships with friends and family members. Girls aren’t the only ones either.  Large scale surveys concluded that male body image concerns have dramatically increased over the past three decades from 15% to 43% of men being dissatisfied with their bodies. Here’s another fact: Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the U.S. (more common than homicide) and the third leading cause of death for ages 15 to 24 years.

No kid is a lost cause. No one should have to feel bad about themselves because they aren’t being loved by themselves and others.

Hey you reader:

You’re freaking wonderful, and you’re appreciated, and no one in the world can replace you.

About the Contributor
Photo of Courtney Strom
Courtney Strom, Reporter

I am a Sartell (obviously) Senior, a certified (iced) tea-aholic, and I enjoy reading and a good pun. When I'm not at school, reading, or drinking tea you'll...

Matt’s Movie Corner: American Sniper

Matt’s Movie Corner: American Sniper

American Sniper, in theatres now, is the true story of Navy Seal sniper, Chris Kyle. The movie stars Bradley Cooper and is directed by legendary  Clint Eastwood. The film focuses on the four tours of duty that Chris Kyle served in Iraq/Afghanistan.

The movie, directed by veteran Clint Eastwood, takes its time. It slowly picks away at the man that was Chris Kyle. In real life, a fellow soldier who had severe PTSD shot Chris Kyle to death in 2013. It is tragic that an American hero died this way. The movie asks whether Kyle was a hero, if he saw himself that way, or if others saw him that way. In his tours of duty, Kyle had 160 confirmed kills and was considered by his comrades as a protector from God. Kyle only wanted to save as many people as possible. He was considered very controversial because people would ask the question whether it was right to sacrifice one life to save many.

Cooper gives an outstanding performance as Kyle. He embodies the character so much that even his physical movements are altered. It is a joy to watch him in action. Eastwood also knows what he’s doing behind the camera. He chose to focus heavily on Cooper’s face to effectively convey the emotion of the character. There are also loads of exciting action for the more thrill-seeking viewers. B+

 

The Slang of SHS: part 5

OG/OC/RN

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In this edition of the slang of SHS, I will be covering abbreviations here at SHS. Since the beginning of time mankind has been attempting to streamline communication. With the rise of texting, only a few letters can stand for full words. At Sartell High School, students are quick to jump on this abbreviation train. Here are a few of them: OC, OG, and RN

 

SHS Definition:

 OC adjective

1: (adj) Out of control

Ex:

1: Bro, chill out you are way too OC right now.

 

OG noun

1: (n) Original gangster

Ex:

1: I love Tupac. He is a real OG.

 

RN adverb

1: (adv) Right now

Ex:

1: Hey man, I’m coming over RN.

About the Writer
Jason Koopman, Journalist

An inhabitant of suburban America, Jason Koopman is a 7 time Finger Jousting World Champion. An expert in hand to hand combat, he is boldly humble, carelessly...

The Slang of SHS: part 4

Roast/Chirp/Spitting Fire

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In this article of the slang of SHS, I will be covering how SHS students joke around with others. Here at Sartell High, students do not make fun of others, and it is not just because we are outstanding kids. Here at Sartell High School, students roast, chirp, and spit fire.

To roast has nothing to do with succulent meat cooked in a pot. Rather, roasting involves a verbal onslaught directed towards another person. Usually one person is roasted by the whole squad (group of people).

A chirp is very similar to a roast, but much less callous. Chirping could be more closely related to trash talking. It has a very playful, joking nature.

The king of all ridiculing is spitting fire. Fire, like it sounds, is hot. Only this type of fire is referring to the words being “hot” or controversial. The act of spitting fire is directing these highly controversial words towards somebody. If the fire that has been spit is malicious enough, it may be categorized as “straight fire.”

 

SHS Definition:

 

Roast verb (rOHst)

1: (v) A verbal ridiculing of one person or group (especially accompanied with the whole squad)

 Ex:

1: I hate when I get roasted by the whole squad in the group chat.

 

Chirp verb (chERRp)

1: (v) to poke fun of another being in a playful manner.

 Ex:

1: I got chirped so hard for my pink pants.

 

Spitting Fire verb (spITing fayuher)

1: The act of shooting verbal projectiles towards another person (especially when it leaves that person, or another person that hears it in shock.)

Ex:

1: Did you see her tweet? She was spitting straight fire!

About the Writer
Jason Koopman, Journalist

An inhabitant of suburban America, Jason Koopman is a 7 time Finger Jousting World Champion. An expert in hand to hand combat, he is boldly humble, carelessly...

The slang of SHS: part 3

Salty/Rattled

The+slang+of+SHS%3A+part+3

In this article of the “The slang of SHS” we will cover how Sartell High School students become upset. Here at Sartell High School one does not simply become mad, angry, agitated, or upset. NO. At SHS, students are either rattled or salty.

Webster’s Dictionary defines rattle as, “to chatter incessantly and aimlessly.” Much like a baby’s rattle, the act of being rattled (sometimes pronounced RAAAAATLEEEEED) is similar to being vigorously shaken about. To be rattled here at SHS means to become flustered or upset.

Unlike it sounds, being salty has nothing to do with seasoning your food. In fact, being salty could not be more different than the white stuff in your shaker. While being salty also has to do with being angry and upset, it differs from being simply rattled in the fact that salty has a more deeply rooted hatred.

SHS Definition:

 

Rattled adjective.(rATŸeld)

1: (adj) Flustered or upset.

2: (adj) Shocked or stunned.

Ex:

1: Bro, I have knots in my Jordans. I am so rattled.

2: I am so rattled. I just failed my art final.

Salty adjective (sALLŸtee)

1: (adj) sinister anger.

Ex:

Student 1: I hate Joe’s shoes. They are so ugly.

Student 2: Maybe you are just salty because he has sweet Jordans.

 

About the Writer
Jason Koopman, Journalist

An inhabitant of suburban America, Jason Koopman is a 7 time Finger Jousting World Champion. An expert in hand to hand combat, he is boldly humble, carelessly...

The slang of SHS: part 2

Sauce/Snag

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In this article of “The slang of SHS,” I will be focusing on another widely used term around Sartell High School. At SHS items are not grabbed, passed, or handed over, but rather they are sauced, and sometimes snagged, but mainly sauced.

The word sauce has come a long way from its hockey origins. Sauce is derived from the term “saucer pass”; meaning to float the puck through the air to a teammate as opposed to on the ice.

At Sartell High School, sauce has come to replace the act of passing or grabbing something for someone, but is not limited to just this act. It is possible, and I repeat it is possible, to sauce numbers into a calculator, or to sauce answers onto a worksheet, or complete other tasks by such nature. While seeming weird, this is not uncommon.

Kyle Och and Grant Lahn might frequently say ‘Sauce me the rock’ on the basketball court.”

Snag is a term that can sometimes replace the act of saucing in events such as grabbing or passing.

 

SHS Definition:

Sauce verb (SAWsss)

1: (v) The act of passing or handing something; giving.

2: (v) To move something from one medium to another. (Especially to do with information)

 

Ex:

1: Hey, sauce me the stapler.

2: Will you sauce your number into my phone?

 

Snag verb (snAg)

1: (v) To grab. (Especially for another person)

Ex:

1: Could you snag me a worksheet from the front of the room?

The slang of SHS: part 1

Feen/Figurin'

The+slang+of+SHS%3A+part+1

With all of the slang terms used, a day at Sartell High School could be much like one spent in a foreign country. Students knowingly, and unknowingly throw out terms on a consistent basis.

As a student at Sartell, keeping up with the latest terms proves to be an important and monumental task. This same task seems to be even more difficult for the SHS faculty, “I would never even try to say the slang because it would be too awkward. It wouldn’t sound right coming from me,” said English teacher Mrs. Nelson.

In an attempt to help educate the student and faculty population of Sartell High School, I will be defining a few select words.

For week one I have selected two widely used words around the halls of SHS: feen and figurin’.

Feen is a word that has evolved much from its original meaning. Dictonary.com defines feen, actually spelt fiend, as an evil spirit or a diabolically cruel and wicked person.

Figurin’ is a word short for figuring.

 

SHS definition:

 

Feen noun/verb (fēn)

1: (n) A person who begs others for items, favors, goods, etc.

2: (v) The act of coveting items, favors, goods, etc. from someone.

Ex:

1: He always asks me for my gum. What a feen.

2: Hey bro, I am so thirsty. Can I feen a drink from your water bottle?

 

Figurin’ verb (FigŸerŸin)

1: (v) To assume greatly.

 

Ex:

Student 1: I am the best football player in Sartell.

Student 2: Dude, you are figurin’ pretty hard.

 

About the Writer
Jason Koopman, Journalist

An inhabitant of suburban America, Jason Koopman is a 7 time Finger Jousting World Champion. An expert in hand to hand combat, he is boldly humble, carelessly...

Sartell students attend We Day 2014

Sartell+students+attend+We+Day+2014

Karrie Fredrickson

Every young person has the power to change the world.

This philosophy of empowerment was impressed upon the attendees who jam-packed the Excel Energy Center in St. Paul, MN last Wednesday for the 7th annual We Day.

ExcelKarrie Fredrickson

We Day is an event where thousands of people come together to be inspired to change the world. Last year’s focus was on how as individuals you can change the world by being conscious of what you say to others and how you act. This year’s focus was more on how to give back, locally and globally.

Chaperone and organizer of the field trip, Karrie Fredrickson, explained that We Day this year was a mix of speakers, like Magic Johnson, Martin Sheen, and Nelson Mandela’s grandson, and performers, like Colbie Caillat, The Band Perry, and Lennon and Maisy Stella that support giving and want to encourage young people to do what they can to make this world a better place.

Hali Peterson, a ninth grader who attended We Day, said her favorite part was “Magic Johnson. It was inspirational that he donated a million dollars to Feed the Children.” According to the We Day website, Feed the Children is “an international charity and educational partner [of We Day], working both domestically and internationally to empower and enable youth to be agents of change.”

Since it’s inaugural event in 2007, We Day has raised $37,000,000 for 1000 different causes. One of the charities that was highlighted this year was Fundraising Rafiki. In Swahili, the word Rafiki means friend. The women (“mamas” the organization calls them) from villages in Kenya hand-make pieces of jewelry to be sold. Of the money earned from the jewelry, 50% of it goes right back to the village. One of the guests of honor at We Day was a “mama” from Kenya.

rafikiMichele Nelson

Many students from Sartell schools attended this spectacular event. The middle school sent 70 plus students along with many teacher chaperones like Dave Gunderson, Luke Rude, Lori Dornburg, and Karlye Barron. The high school sent 66 students and three teachers, Angie Heckman, Jen Traver, and Karrie Fredrickson.

66Karrie Fredrickson

High school students who were invited to this event were mostly National Honor Society and Student Council students who are required to participate in many volunteer programs around the Sartell Community. After this opportunity was offered to students in these two program, Mrs. Fredrickson opened it up to the rest of the student body. Those who chose to participate in We Day then had to promise to be a part of the StudCo and NHS volunteering later on this school year.

We Day isn’t meant to be just a one-day-a-year thing. The We Day website explains, “We Day is an investment. The immediate impact is the millions of dollars raised for local and international charities, and the millions of hours volunteered. As Mission Measurement’s study of alumni shows above, the long-term impact is that young people are more likely to volunteer, vote and give—for years to come.”

Mrs. Fredrickson shares We Day’s sentiments, “It is my hope that the power of [Wednesday] ripples out from the people that participated.”

 

About the Contributor
Photo of Michele Nelson
Michele Nelson,

Hello! Thanks for checking out SHS's LeSabre.  We love that you're visiting our page!

Our View: The Le Sabre staff on MSHSL transgender policy

Our+View%3A+The+Le+Sabre+staff+on+MSHSL+transgender+policy

Opinions differed amongst the Le Sabre staff members last Friday, in Mrs. Nelson’s room. The topic was the Minnesota State High School League transgender policy dealing with locker rooms, and which activities (boy’s or girl’s) they should participate in. A transgender is someone who has the reproductive parts that define us as either male or female, but identify with the other gender. Over the past week MSHSL officials have debated on a new policy regarding transgender high school athletes. Although the policy was supposed to be determined last week, the committee decided to table the decision to a later date.

The Le Sabre Staff was split three ways. The debate was heated. One opinion is that those who identify as transgender should change in the locker room based on their biological parts. Gaby Hagen shares her thoughts, “It’s not about feelings; it’s about parts.”

Another view expressed by the Le Sabre staff is that transgenders should be allowed to change in the locker rooms and participate in the sports that they identify with.

Lastly, some argued that any decision would offend one view no matter what. They argued that there was no winner in this situation.

Nevertheless, as MSHSL officials continue to debate this situation, it is sure to remain a controversial topic.

About the Writer
Jason Koopman, Journalist

An inhabitant of suburban America, Jason Koopman is a 7 time Finger Jousting World Champion. An expert in hand to hand combat, he is boldly humble, carelessly...

Our View: the LeSabre Staff on Lunches

 

It was heated discussion time in Mrs. Nelson’s classroom, home of the LeSabre, last Friday. The topic of debate was our school lunches. The most touched on part of the whole debacle was not that OUR school lunches were too small, or that the amount of food we are getting is not enough, but that if we are getting smaller meals (or meals the same size as kindergarteners), has the obesity rate really changed?

It was unanimously stated among the journalism staff that our current lunches aren’t what they used to be. We’d realized that now kids are bringing more lunches from home, to which Jake Martin stated, “If I don’t have to obey the school lunch rules then, hey, I’m going to bring zebra-cakes.”

But what about the kids eating at school? The portions are smaller; they’re obviously eating less at school, and at home? They’re more likely to go home and stuff their faces with the first thing they can find. That’s where we’re thinking the obesity is coming from.

It’s not anyone’s fault, don’t get us wrong, we’re not blaming anyone. We’re just disappointed that the government limits to only so many calories and with such strict limitations, we can’t really eat what we want to eat, or get what we need. Organic is definitely better for us, but is it that much better than our good-old Toasty Dogs? Because of how we have been raised, or been functioning, we’re not used to taking the healthier option at school; ultimately, then, we end up with funky fruits or vulgar veggies, and we coin a phrase like Sam Chappell, “That’s not organic, it’s just old.”

Another question that was dicussed is the school losing money now? If so many kids are eating cold lunch, that means less hot lunches are being bought. So, what are the benefits of this program? No money and a bigger obesity problem? We just aren’t sure.

We’d come to the conclusion that because of our minimal calorie lunches, more kids are eating unhealthy snacks because they’re easy and the students are just plain hungry.

About the Contributor
Photo of Courtney Strom
Courtney Strom, Reporter

I am a Sartell (obviously) Senior, a certified (iced) tea-aholic, and I enjoy reading and a good pun. When I'm not at school, reading, or drinking tea you'll...

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  • Hi, you

    2014-2015

    Hi, you’re appreciated

  • Matt’s Movie Corner: American Sniper

    2014-2015

    Matt’s Movie Corner: American Sniper

  • The Slang of SHS: part 5

    2014-2015

    The Slang of SHS: part 5

  • The Slang of SHS: part 4

    2014-2015

    The Slang of SHS: part 4

  • The slang of SHS: part 3

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    The slang of SHS: part 3

  • The slang of SHS: part 2

    2014-2015

    The slang of SHS: part 2

  • The slang of SHS: part 1

    2014-2015

    The slang of SHS: part 1

  • Sartell students attend We Day 2014

    2014-2015

    Sartell students attend We Day 2014

  • Our View: The Le Sabre staff on MSHSL transgender policy

    2014-2015

    Our View: The Le Sabre staff on MSHSL transgender policy

  • Our View: the LeSabre Staff on Lunches

    2014-2015

    Our View: the LeSabre Staff on Lunches

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