Mass shooting in Australia

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Mass shooting in Australia

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On May 11th, Australia had one of their worst mass shooting since 1996.

Seven people, four children, were found dead on a property in Western Australia. The victims have not been publicly identified yet. 

Police are currently responding to what I can only describe as a horrific incident.”

— Police Commissioner Chris Dawson

The authorities were called in around 5 a.m., to the home of Cynda and Peter Miles in Osmington, a village about 170 miles south of Perth. The police are not pursuing a suspect, as they believe it was a murder-suicide.

The country has been an analogy for stricter gun control in the United States.

The United States government defines mass shootings as, “…four victims must be killed.”

Australia’s last mass shooting was in 1996, when a lone gunman open fired and killed 35 people in Tasmania, which prompted the government to introduce stricter gun control.

Before now, a mass shooting had only happened one other time. In 2014, a farmer killed his wife and three children before turning the gun on himself.

Australian laws states that farmers are allowed to have firearms, as they have a legitimate reason; they need to kill feral pests or sick and injured livestock.

Automatic, semi-automatic rifles and shotguns are not allowed into public hands.

The chair of Gun Control Australia, Samantha Lee, said rural areas were overrepresented in gun deaths, including suicides.

“Regional and rural areas are particularly vulnerable to these sorts of tragedies, because of the combination of isolation, sometimes mental or financial hardship and easy access to firearms.”

The police said they would identify victims only after next of kin had been notified.

 

 

 

 

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