Austin bombings confuse police

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Austin bombings confuse police

Photo via flickr under the Creative Commons license.

Photo via flickr under the Creative Commons license.

Photo via flickr under the Creative Commons license.

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It seems like something directly out of Criminal Minds. Bombing after bombing after bombing. As of now, two people have died and two have been seriously injured.

“This is a public threat,” Nelson Linder, president of NAACP’s [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] Austin chapter, said Monday.

Tragedy has struck five times this month. Bombs concealed as packages have been left on doorsteps of three houses. The fourth was attached to a for sale sign and was rigged with a trip wire, which the police say shows “a higher level of sophistication, a higher level of skill,” said Brian Manley, the interim Austin police chief. The fifth was in the FedEx shipping building.

The working theory right now … is that that was a package that was in the shipping center destined for Austin.”

— Brian Manley

The first three bombs were detonated in predominantly African-American and Hispanic neighborhoods. The fourth bomb was attached with a trip wire on a for sale sign which means that anyone could have tripped it. The neighborhood where this happened was an affluent white neighborhood, which confused the police, as they were working with a racial basis lead.

“With this tripwire, this changes things,” Christopher Combs, special agent in charge of the FBI’s San Antonio office. “It’s more sophisticated. It’s not targeted to individuals. We’re very concerned that with tripwires, a child could be walking down the sidewalk and hit something.”

I’m sure it’s on the minds of a lot of law enforcement that they have a serial killer on their hands.”

— Dan Defenbaugh, a former FBI official

Authorities have no leads right now. They have pleaded with the attacker or attackers to communicate with them. There is a $115,000 reward for anyone with information pertaining to the case. The federal government is working with Austin officers, as well as other Texas police department.

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