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About two weeks ago tragedy struck Florida. There was yet, another, school shooting. Ever since then, new facts have come out, as well as conspiracies.

Conspiracy theories are not new to our culture. There are theories about 9-11, cell phones, and even past presidents. Usually, when tragedy strikes people come up with conspiracy theories to cope, school shootings are no exception.

School conspiracy theories peaked after the Sandy Hook massacre. Many people were saying that the parents were crisis actors and that the government orchestrated the whole event. Other people don’t even think it happened; it was just a ruse.

A popular Florida theory is that all the survivors are actually actors hired by politicians and the government to help further their own gun control agenda. Many people, sadly, firmly believe that teenagers do not know much about the world, let alone about gun control and violence.

Conspiracy theories are for losers, people who have lost an election, money or influence look for something to explain that loss.”

— Joseph Uscinski, a professor at the University of Miami

These teenagers are speaking up about this violence rather rapidly and forcefully, which helped spark this rumor. These teenagers, mainly Emma Gonzalez, are uniting the nation by spreading word about marches around the country.

So what makes conspiracy theories so popular and appealing? Conspiracy theories might seem like fun and games, but the results can actually be quite damaging. For example, a theory once stated that autism is caused by vaccines, which obviously, led to a decrease in vaccinations, or in other words, a rise of preventable diseases.

Although no one can really explain why these theories are so popular, there are many hypotheses.

One of these hypotheses is the fact that everyone wants to be unique and original. Due to this want of “unique-ness,” people will sometimes think things up just so they can say they have a different opinion or view.

Another hypothesis is the environment and habits in which believers live and have. According to research done by ScientificNordic, people with low education levels are more likely to believe in these theories.

But these theories haven’t just come out. Conspiracy theories have been around for centuries. The birth of the internet has just sped up the spread of them. “People blame the Internet or even TV shows like The X-Files. But the research shows that’s not true. The internet has made it quicker and easier to share theories, but there has always been this background hum of conspiracy. It’s a fundamental part of being human.”

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About the Writer
Kassy Markey, Journalist
Grade: Senior Go-to Article of Clothing: Turtleneck Living Room Decoration Must Have: A ceramic cat My favorite animal: Dog and goats My favorite car: A white Range Rover Quote to Live By: “Now, I know we have still not shattered that highest and hardest glass ceiling, but someday, someone will, and hopefully sooner than we might think...
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