The LeSabre

Filed under Food

Getting to know your food: pt. 2, dos-ing out the info

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






For score and four moons ago, a survey was sent out to students of SHS to assess their opinions and knowledge about genetically modified organisms (GMOs). A short article was written for The Le Sabre to share the info.

Finally, part two of that article has been made available for your viewing and knowledge-gaining purposes.

To start, genetically modified organisms, genetically engineered organisms, or GMOs by definition are:

GMO
noun 
1.  genetically modified organism: an organism or microorganism whose genetic material has been altered by means of genetic engineering.

Most people immediately jump right on the wagon of “genetic engineering means scientists are messing with our foods in a lab with chemicals and flasks and flames.” But in actuality, genetic engineering happens in nature, without extra help from scary scientists.

According to one of my family members who works for an agriculture company that produces agrochemicals, seeds, and is a biotechnology company that does genomic research, here are some interesting points about GMOs:

  • Most new information is introduced to crops through natural processes. This usually means a naturally occurring bacteria, like Agrobacterium tumefaciens which lives in soil, essentially takes the wanted trait. Then the crop takes in the bacteria, and the bacteria inserts its own DNA into the plant. Most traits that have been wanted are already naturally occurring to begin with. 

    If we are expected to feed the population of over 9 billion by 2025 with decreasing land for agriculture, then there has to be something done to move our crops to the modern age. ”

  • Many crops that are being genetically pushed along are grain crops. These crops are usually corn and soybeans that get fed to livestock which many studies show has no negative impact on humans.
  • The world population is growing, and your crops from the past cannot keep up. Most traits allow for there to be more food produced, without huge amounts of added synthetic chemicals that can do harm to people. If we are expected to feed the population of over 9 billion by 2025 with decreasing land for agriculture, then there has to be something done to move our crops to the modern age.

Another family member who studied evolutionary biology and who has a PhD in biology also reflected on GMOs in today’s society. She says that overall she “has mixed feelings.” There are pros, like adding “genes for things like vitamin A in rice for 3rd world countries,” but also cons like”adding genes not usually associated with plants like Round Up resistance.”

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Getting to know your food: pt. 2, dos-ing out the info

    Entertainment

    These tiny foods are the cutest thing around!

  • Getting to know your food: pt. 2, dos-ing out the info

    Food

    Vegan chicken nuggets?

  • Getting to know your food: pt. 2, dos-ing out the info

    Food

    Cornerstone Buffet offers students and teachers discount

  • Getting to know your food: pt. 2, dos-ing out the info

    Food

    10 Delicious Thanksgiving leftover recipes

  • Getting to know your food: pt. 2, dos-ing out the info

    Food

    Homemade Peanut Pupper Dog Treats

  • Getting to know your food: pt. 2, dos-ing out the info

    Food

    Not Your Grandma’s Cooking

  • Getting to know your food: pt. 2, dos-ing out the info

    Food

    Marena’s Bagel Shop Stop: Big Apple Bagels

  • Getting to know your food: pt. 2, dos-ing out the info

    Food

    9 American foods banned in other countries

  • Getting to know your food: pt. 2, dos-ing out the info

    Food

    BoDiddley’s Review

  • Getting to know your food: pt. 2, dos-ing out the info

    Food

    Noodles & Co. review

Getting to know your food: pt. 2, dos-ing out the info